Deep Dish Jelly Fish

Walked the beach first thing in the morning, the park opens at 8 am, and found some nice shells and good conversation.  I like to start my beach hellos with “Did you find anything good today?”  You can tell a sheller by the stooped walk and the immediate bag rustling after you ask that question.  Lately it has been, “Nothing very good, the shells are pretty beat up.”  I also like to ask, “Where are you from?”  This time I got Chicago, so we bonded over Pequod’s, Lou Malnati’s, hot dogs and beef sandwiches.  Then talked switched from Deep dish pizza to the HUGE washed up Jellyfish dotting the beach.  Red Tide?  We wondered if it was back, but it doesn’t seem to be.  The ladies remembered coming to the beach in years past, finding Olive shells the size of their hands.  The good old days.  There is nothing like a friendly conversation in the warm morning sun on the beach.

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All the Dead Fish Should Have Been a Warning Sign

 

I was very excited to be the first one in the North parking lot on Tuesday.  I started walking the deserted beach on a mission to take “beachy” pictures for my friend’s surf company.  “Oh there’s a dead fish,” no big deal.  “Agh, there’s another dead fish,” okay.  “THERE ARE A TON OF DEAD FISH,” I think I’ll hang out here for 2 hours.  I didn’t even think to myself, “You should leave because it’s probably the RED TIDE.”  I kept on shelling and taking pictures amongst the dead fish, the dead blowfish and even, as one beachcomber alerted me to, a “dead baby Shark.”   Red tide happens every year when a specific algae, Karenia brevis, blooms.  Lots of marine life dies and it can cause respiratory issues in humans.  It smelled like fish that morning but I had no problems breathing.  Although I probably would have walked away if there had been a sign posted about the Red Tide.
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I found a few good shells and took a ton of “beachy” pictures…

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amongst the dead creatures.

 

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